Ohio Criminal Expungement Matthew Mishak Attorney Elyria Lorain County

5 Ways an Ohio Record Expungement Can Help You

 

In life we all make mistakes.

 

Unfortunately, some mistakes, like a criminal conviction, can follow you and make simple things like getting a good job more difficult than those without a record.

Some think it is not worth their time to have misdemeanors or certain felonies expunged or sealed from potential viewing. Truth is, the mistakes of the past can hinder your life in the present and future.

 

If you don’t want those mistakes following you for the rest of your life, you might want to consider talking to an experienced lawyer, like Matthew Mishak, to see if it is possible to get an Ohio Criminal Record Expungement.

 

In the meantime, to help you make an educated decision, here are five ways an Ohio Criminal Record Expungement may help you live a better quality of life.

 

Job

job application criminal recordEver noticed that all job applications have a section where they ask if you’ve ever been convicted of a crime? This can give one a sense of dread if you have in fact been convicted. Some are tempted to lie and pray the employer won’t find out, but this is never a good course of action.

With an Ohio criminal record expungement, you can honestly answer “No” to this question with no fear of the employer finding out you lied.

 

Loans

job application criminal recordWhether it is a bank loan for a car, home, or personal expenses, if you have a conviction on your record, it is possible that the financial institution can deny your loan. They could also view your criminal record as someone who is not responsible enough to pay debts, or give you a ridiculous interest rate in order to obtain the loan.

Having your criminal record expunged can help eliminate this embarrassing and sometimes costly outcome.

 

Housing

rental with criminal recordMost landlords, rental and property management companies, and real estate agencies will favor someone without a criminal record over someone with one, no matter how old that conviction is. This goes almost hand in hand with getting a job or a loan.

An Ohio criminal record expungement can pave the way to a happy home for you and your loved ones.

 

Schooling and State Licensing

college application criminal recordYou could get denied admission to a college or career training facility and even funding for your education with a criminal conviction on your record. You can also be denied any state certifications or licensing, for example in the medical field.

Don’t discount yourself and look into getting your record sealed. A record expungement can open up a world of opportunities for you.

 

Freedom

freedom record expungmentThe best reason to get an Ohio Record Expungement is for your own peace of mind and freedom!

It’s a lot easier than you think to have your record sealed in Ohio. Attorney Matthew Mishak has the experience and know-how to get your record expunged in the Ohio court system. 

When you get a criminal record expungement, you have a clean slate to move on with your life knowing that nothing will come back to haunt you.

Aren’t you worthy of a fresh start?


 

For more information and/or to see if you are eligible to have your record expunged, contact Attorney Mishak today. 

 


divorce and child custody Matt Mishak Attorney Lorain County Ohio Elyria North Ridgeville

FAQ: Child Custody and Divorce

If one parent moves out and leaves the kids with the other parent, does it hurt the moving parent’s chances of getting custody at a later date?

 

In a word, yes.

Even when a parent leaves to avoid a dangerous or highly unpleasant situation, if the parent hopes to have physical custody at a later time it’s unwise to leave the children behind. The parent who leaves sends a message to the court that the other parent is a suitable choice for physical custody. Also, assuming the children stay in the home where the parents lived as a family, continue in the same school, and participate in their usual activities, a judge may be reluctant to change physical custody, if only to avoid disrupting the children’s regular routines.

If a parent must leave the familial home (and wants to be the primary physical custodian), the moving parent should take the children along and, as quickly as possible, file in family court for temporary custody and child support. If this process is delayed, the other parent may go to court first and allege that the kids were taken without that parent’s consent or knowledge.

Family law judges frown on a parent who removes the children from the home without seeking the court’s recognition. A judge may order that the children be returned to the family home, pending future proceedings to determine physical custody.

 

Are courts more likely to award custody to mothers than to fathers?

 

In the past, most states provided that custody of children of “tender years” (about five and under) had to be awarded to the mother when parents divorced. In most states, this rule has either been rejected entirely or relegated to the role of tie-breaker if two otherwise fit parents request custody of their preschool children.

No state now requires that a child be awarded to the mother without regard to the fitness of both parents. Most states require their courts to determine child custody on the basis of what’s in the children’s best interests, without regard to the parent’s gender.

As it turns out, many divorcing parents agree that the mother will have custody after a separation or divorce and that the father will exercise reasonable visitation. This sometimes happens because the parents agree that the mother has more time, a greater inclination, or a better understanding of the children’s daily needs. But it can also be because fathers presume that mothers will be awarded custody or because the mother is more tenacious in seeking custody.

If you are a father and want to ask the court for physical custody, do not let gender stereotypes stop you. If both you and the mother work full-time, and the kids have after-school care, you may be on equal footing. In fact, if you have more flexible hours than the mother, you could have a leg up. In any event, the judge will look at what’s best for the children.

So if you think that you should have primary custody and that you can persuade the judge that it’s in the kids’ best interests, you should go ahead and ask for custody. If you present yourself as willing and able to parent, it will go a long way towards challenging any lingering prejudice against you as a father.

 

Does child custody always go to just one parent?

 

No. Courts frequently award at least partial custody to both parents, called “joint custody.” Joint custody takes one of three forms:

  • joint physical custody (children spend a substantial amount of time with each parent)
  • joint legal custody (parents share decision-making on medical, educational, and religious questions involving the children), or
  • both joint legal and joint physical custody.

 

Are there special issues if a gay or lesbian parent is seeking child custody or visitation rights?

 

In a number of states, a parent’s sexual orientation cannot in and of itself prevent a parent from being given custody of or visitation with his or her child.

As a practical matter, however, lesbian and gay parents — even in those states — may be denied custody or visitation. This is because judges, when considering the best interests of the child, may be motivated by their own or community prejudices, and may find reasons other than the lesbian or gay parent’s sexual orientation to deny custody or appropriate visitation.

If you are involved in a custody case and are concerned about bias against you because you are gay or lesbian, make sure you consult a lawyer about protecting your rights. 

 

Is race ever an issue in child custody or visitation decisions?

 

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that it is unconstitutional for a court to consider race when a noncustodial parent petitions for a change of custody.

In Palmore v. Sidoti, 466 U.S. 429 (1984), a white couple divorced, and the mother was awarded custody of their son. She remarried an African-American man and moved to a predominantly African-American neighborhood. The father filed a request for modification of custody based on the changed circumstances. A Florida court granted the modification, but the U.S. Supreme Court reversed, ruling that societal stigma, especially related to race, cannot be the basis for a custody decision.

 

Who determines how much visitation is reasonable and fair?

 

When a court awards physical child custody to one parent and “reasonable” visitation to the other, the parent with physical custody is generally in the driver’s seat regarding what is reasonable. This need not be bad if the parents cooperate to see that the kids spend a significant amount of time with each parent.

Unfortunately, it sometimes translates into little visitation time with the noncustodial parent, resulting in disputes over missed visits and inconvenience. To avoid such problems, many courts now prefer for the parties to work out a fairly detailed parenting plan that sets the visitation schedule and outlines who has responsibility for decisions affecting the children.

 

Is mediation the best approach to solving disagreements about child custody?

 

Mediation is a non-adversarial process where a neutral person (a mediator) meets with disputing persons to help them settle a dispute.

The mediator does not have the power to impose a solution on the parties but assists them in creating an agreement of their own.

In some courts, however, the mediator may be asked by the court to make a recommendation if the parties cannot reach an agreement. If you’re concerned about whether the mediation is confidential or whether the mediator will be reporting to the judge, find out how your court does things before you get started.

There are several important reasons why mediation is a superior method to litigation for resolving custody and visitation disputes.

  • Mediation usually does not involve lawyers or expert witnesses (or their astronomical fees).
  • Mediation usually produces a settlement after five to ten hours of mediation over a week or two. (Child custody litigation can drag on for months or even years.)
  • Mediation enhances communication between the parents and makes it much more likely that they will be able to cooperate after the divorce or separation when it comes to raising their children. Experts who have studied the effects of divorce on children universally conclude that when divorcing or separating parents can cooperate, the children suffer far less.

 

Original article on Nolo.com

 


Seeking a divorce and have questions?
Attorney Mishak can help you.
Contact him today.

 


record expungement Ohio new law October 2018 record sealing Mishak Law Matthew Mishak Attorney Lorain County Elyria North Ridgeville Northeast Ohio

Expanded Expungement Law in Ohio

In Ohio, an expungement is the same as sealing a record.

 

Expungement is a legal process provided under Section 2953 of the Ohio Revised Code that allows one to have any and all references to a prior criminal conviction cleared and their court file sealed. The result of this process is as if you were never convicted of the crime.

 

BIG NEWS! As of October 29, 2018, Ohio officially expanded its expungement law.

 

The new expungement law allows for a review for a person with up to five F4/F5 felonies and/or unlimited misdemeanors.

According to the new statutory makeup in ORC § 2953.32, persons with non-violent, non-sexual misdemeanors and/or felonies up to F4 or F5 may now be eligible for their records to be sealed by a court in Ohio.

Individuals who previously did not qualify to have records sealed might be eligible.

This new expungement law allows for the possibility of all records to be sealed.

 

There are still waiting periods related to the expungement requests following discharge:

 

  • Misdemeanors require a one year waiting period.
  • One F4/F5 Felony requires a three-year waiting period.
  • Two F4/F5 Felonies require a four-year waiting period.
  • Three to Five F4/F5 Felonies require a five-year waiting period.

 

These new laws will not apply to anyone with a F3 or higher felony conviction or those with a conviction which includes a sexual or violent offense, regardless of the result being a felony or a misdemeanor.

The court, of course, has the discretion to determine if a person qualifies for expungement of their criminal record.

Additionally, the prosecutor will be notified of the request and has the ability to object to records being sealed during a scheduled hearing.

 

Who is eligible for an expungement?

 

You qualify if you meet all of the conditions described in Section 2953 of the Ohio Revised Code, including:

  • The conviction you are trying to expunge is not one of the crimes precluded by law.
  • You were not subject to a mandatory prison term for the conviction.  (If you were sentenced to prison time, but you were eligible for community control/probation, you would still qualify.)
  • You have any of the following convictions or combination of convictions: one misdemeanor; or one felony; two misdemeanor convictions; or one misdemeanor conviction and one felony conviction.   (A series of 2 or 3 convictions out of the same case shall be considered one conviction under the expungement statute.) (Minor misdemeanors including most traffic offenses do not count as a conviction.)
  • The statutory waiting period has passed for the conviction you seek to expunge.
  • You have no current or criminal charges pending against you. 

 

Can’t I just represent myself and save money?

 

Expungement requires drafting and filing of a motion (a formal legal document asking the court to take a particular action). The expungement motion will be filed with the court that sentenced you, and it will also have to be served on the prosecutor in some cases, and the probation department.

At the expungement hearing, oral or non-oral, the court must be convinced through persuasion and demonstration that your rehabilitation has been obtained and that you are deserving of an expungement.

An expungement is a privilege and not a right. 

The court may deny your expungement if they question that you have met all the qualifications under the Ohio Revised Code, or the court is not satisfied that you have been rehabilitated.

 

Legal Reference: FindLaw.com


If you would like to learn if you are eligible or request additional expungement law information, contact Attorney Mishak today.